Blue: It's Hue I Am | ©Tom Palladio ImagesCheri Lucas Rowlands of WordPress HQ is knocking on virtual doors around the blogosphere asking each of us to check our personal artist’s palette and select a prominent color that speaks volumes about ourself. It’s THE HUE OF YOU, this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge.

For me, the answer is simple: BLUE. When it comes to this color, the skies really the limit. I fall all over myself whenever the color blue is involved. Let me explain.

Blue: It's Hue I Am | ©Tom Palladio ImagesEvery time I see a blue shirt — on sale or not — in a department store window, I stop dead in my tracks, like a deer caught in the wide swath of oncoming xenon headlights. My heart begins to race, my hands become sweaty, and I start licking my chops. It’s not that I need another blue shirt, let alone a shirt in any color, but when it’s blue I go absolutely BEZERK. 

Just let me have it in all its various shades — from azure to zaffre. 

Blue: It's Hue I Am | ©Tom Palladio ImagesAnd it doesn’t stop with the shirt off my back. I drove blue — a  Mustang that was Atlantic-blue metallic — and my preferred cologne is Blue by Ralph Lauren. I think blue is pretty darn cool. For an upbeat, glass-half-full kinda guy, I’ll color my world blue — palatinate, Persian or powder — any old day, and I do.

Historically, my favorite color is older that the Spanish aristocratic “blue bloods” (limpieza de sangre). 

Blue: It's Hue I Am | ©Tom Palladio ImagesBattle lines were drawn against my morally correct color when the American Civil War of the 1860s pitted Confederate gray of the South against Union blue of the North.

And, during the Great Depression of the 1930s, people just above the bread line could order the “blue-plate” special at a diner – a low-priced daily special for 25 U.S. cents that was served up on a sectionalized blue plate.

Today, folks still sing the blues on the streets of N’awlins, croon like “Ol’ Blue Eyes” along the Vegas Strip and, come Mondays, feel blue.

Blue: It's Hue I Am | ©Tom Palladio ImagesHere in Italy, where I reside, the national flag is known as il Tricolore (tricolors) — green, white and red  but blue is the color that she rallies around whenever her beloved gli Azzurri (The Blues) takes the pitch or lValanga Azzurra (the Blue Avalanche) attacks the ski slopes. And, let’s not forget that the Bel Paese is surrounded by blue: the Adriatic, Ionian, Tyrrhanean, Ligurian and Mediterranean seas.

Senigallia8_WM

Even the “King of Rock and Roll,” Elvis himself, before he left the building, got in on the act, too. He really dug his Blue Suede Shoes, and didn’t want anyone to step on ’em.

Look, I could go on and on about the B in the RGB color model until I’m blue in the face. But I won’t. I’ll just leave it right here.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have to run. There’s a 50%-off sale at a shirt shop just up the street that has a sporty Maya-blue long sleeve with epaulets that has my name on it.

I just can’t help myself, it’s hue I am.

©The Palladian Traveler | ©Tom Palladio Images

TPT Borsalino lt. blue | ©Tom Palladio Images

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Written by The Palladian Traveler

Tom traded his hometown St. Louis Cardinals' baseball cap in the United States for a Borsalino and he now hangs his "capello" in the Puglia region of southeastern Italy. A veteran print and broadcast journalist, with well-worn passports that have got him into and out of 50 countries and counting, Tom fell in love with the "Bel Paese" years ago. As he notes, "I'm inspired by the beauty I find in all things that are very, very old, and reliving history, or at least meandering along cobblestone streets that were laid down over a thousand years ago and just looking up and marveling at what occupies the space still today, really gets my 'Vespa' running." Tom has a good eye behind the lens and is a graphic storyteller, but he'll let you decide as he keeps his camera batteries fully charged and the posts flowing from his creative hideaway in the hills overlooking Ostuni. You can also follow his dispatches along the cobblestone via TravelingBoy.com.

6 comments

      1. Good observation, but also the depression glasses were very colorful to keep people in cheerful disposition. They are highly collectible today and priced very high.

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