Dispatches from the Dolomites: Lago di Braies | ©thepalladiantravelerThe Alta Pusteria, the high valley on the eastern edge of parent Val Pusteria in the South Tyrol of northern Italy, is a natural outdoor recreation center of wild landscape, designed by The Almighty, that undulates below the towering, jagged peaks of the Dolomites, a majestic UNESCO World Heritage site.

In summertime, this suitable-for-framing, forest-filled valley is best discovered on foot or atop a bike. I plan to do both over the next five days.

Dispatches from the Dolomites: Lago di Braies | ©thepalladiantravelerClicking on my iPod’s pedometer app, I place my best foot forward and head towards Lago di Braies with fellow travel blogger Orna O’Reilly and Germano Casati, our local “Sherpa,” on loan from his day job at Hotel Adler, a family-run spa-wellness gasthaus in nearby Villabassa/Niederdorf that’s hosting our stay.

“This hike is not too difficult, but a bit long” Germano tells us as we make our way through an archway adjacent to the 110-year-old Hotel Pragser Wildsee, South Tyrol’s 2013 Historic Inn of the Year, and down onto the rocky path that surrounds the lake for the start of a three-hour trek wrapped around a one-hour lunch.

Dispatches from the Dolomites: Lago di Braies | ©thepalladiantravelerDispatches from the Dolomites | ©thepalladiantraveler

At 1,496 m above sea level, a shoreline stretching 3.5 km, a depth of 36 m and a width between 300-400 m, Lago di Braies is the largest of all the natural lakes that dot the Dolomite landscape. A true gem in the wilderness, the lake shimmers in the bright sunlight as it showcases an array of brilliant blue-to-green shades.

From mid June to the end of September, you can rent by the hour a classic wooden rowboat, take a leap of faith into the icy-cold water then let one of the 300 days of guaranteed sunshine dry you off, cast a line out and go fishing, even sunbathe.

Dispatches from the Dolomites: Lago di Braies | ©thepalladiantravelerOr, you can do like we’re doing and hang a right through a large, wooden swinging gate and start the climb up another rocky path, leaving the lakeside behind as you enter the 25,000 hectare Nature Park of Fanes-Sennes-Braies.

The park is filled with lush-green forests, well-marked hiking trails, and wide pastures and high plateau meadows that are ideal grazing and lounging areas for contented cows.

Dispatches from the Dolomites: Lago di Braies | ©thepalladiantravelerThere’s also the occasional rustic rifugio, like Grunwald Hütte in the Malga Foresta, where this party of three takes a load off to put the feedbag on underneath a large outdoor canopy filled with picnic tables.

Nothing fancy, we dine on simple South Tyrolean fare: speck, pepper cheese, boiled sausage, polenta with more cheese, and cabbage with cumin. It’s all washed down with a pitcher of the rifugio’s ruby-red wine from the Kalterer See.

We satisfy our collective sweet tooth by sharing a large plate of Kaiserschmarrm (Emperor’s mess), named in honor of Kaiser Franz Joseph of Austria who loved these shredded pancakes sprinkled with powdered sugar and dipped in a fruit preserve sauce.

Dispatches from the Dolomites: Lago di Braies | ©thepalladiantravelerRetracing our steps, we leave the nature park and head back down the rocky trail until we’re standing once again along the shores of Lago di Braies, debating which direction to go.

Hang a left and we can take the flat, easy route back to the parking lot. Or, we can turn right and negotiate the higher, tougher and longer trail to complete our circumnavigation of the lake.

Hey, no pain, no gain. We hang a right.

Dispatches from the Dolomites: Lago di Braies | ©thepalladiantraveler

Dispatches from the Dolomites: Lago di Braies | ©thepalladiantravelerIt seems like everyone vacationing in the Alta Pusteria decided to visit the lake today.

The narrow, upper trail is packed, like sardines in a can, as we frequently have to tuck ourselves into small openings in the rock to yield to the oncoming foot traffic.

Stopping frequently, I take advantage of the slow pace and get off a few shots of the landscape below.

Back in the parking lot, I check the pedometer on the iPod: 12,836 steps covering 8.5 km. Not too bad for an old trailblazer like me.

Dispatches from the Dolomites | ©thepalladiantravelerFor complete information about Lago di Braies, as well as all of the other sights and activities around the Alta Pusteria, logon to the Consorzio Turistico Alta Pusteria by clicking HERE.

For complete information on Hotel Adler in Villabassa/Niederdorf, our four-star host for this visit to the South Tyrol, just click HERE.

Join us again tomorrow when we mount a couple of city bikes for a scenic, 45 km ride into Austria.

©The Palladian Traveler

Borsalino w/ props SMALL | ©Tom Palladio Images

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Written by The Palladian Traveler

Tom traded his hometown St. Louis Cardinals' baseball cap in the United States for a Borsalino and he now hangs his "capello" in the Puglia region of southeastern Italy. A veteran print and broadcast journalist, with well-worn passports that have got him into and out of 50 countries and counting, Tom fell in love with the "Bel Paese" years ago. As he notes, "I'm inspired by the beauty I find in all things that are very, very old, and reliving history, or at least meandering along cobblestone streets that were laid down over a thousand years ago and just looking up and marveling at what occupies the space still today, really gets my 'Vespa' running." Tom has a good eye behind the lens and is a graphic storyteller, but he'll let you decide as he keeps his camera batteries fully charged and the posts flowing from his creative hideaway in the hills overlooking Ostuni. You can also follow his dispatches along the cobblestone via TravelingBoy.com.

6 comments

  1. Some stunning photographs and what better way to see the scenery than to walk through it… I have been thinking of a trip to Europe at some point, and you have given me another place to add to my list.. Thank you for sharing 🙂

    Like

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